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Archived Updates

Notices, Policies & Procedures

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

JUNE 29, 2020

The attestation form below indicates that Mass General Brigham meets the Phase 2 criteria and standards described by the Mass Department of Public Health Hospital Reopening Guidance for Phase 2 of reopening.

 

Logo for Massachusetts Department of Public Health.For more information, visit the Commonwealth of Massachusetts’ Reopening Website.

MGB Acute care attestation 6.9.20 submitted to DPH

Massachusetts Department of Public Health Guidance
Reopen Approach for Acute Care Hospitals
Phase 2: Cautious

 

NOTE: This further guidance incorporates the capacity criteria and public health and safety standards required for Phase 1: Start and outlines additional requirements for acute care hospitals in Phase 2: Cautious, effective June 8, 2020.


I.     Preamble and Purpose

As the Commonwealth continues to monitor trends to support its reopening strategy, recent data show that the impact of COVID-19 on the state’s health care system is beginning to abate. Recognizing a need to begin to provide care deferred during the public health emergency[1], and that telehealth may not be feasible or clinically appropriate for all patients, the Department of Public Health (DPH) issued guidance on May 18 (updated on May 25) on the Reopen Approach for Acute Care Hospital (“Phase 1 Guidance”). The Phase 1 Guidance describes the scope of in-person services and attestation requirements for acute care hospitals during Phase 1:Start of the Commonwealth’s broader reopening strategy.

Building off of the Phase 1 Guidance, DPH issues this further guidance for how acute care hospitals[2] can resume in-person provision of additional services and procedures in Phase 2: Cautious without jeopardizing health system capacity or the public health standards that are essential to protecting health care workers, patients, families, and the general public. This guidance applies to all hospital-licensed services except for hospital-licensed community health centers and does not apply to emergency care, which has been ongoing and will continue without limitation. DPH recognizes the importance of ensuring that this guidance promote equitable access to care, including high-priority preventative care, across all communities and patient populations, including low-income communities, communities of color, children, and individuals with disabilities.

The initial and ongoing implementation of this guidance is contingent on Massachusetts meeting a range of relevant capacity and public health metrics. Ongoing performance on these measures will inform additional reopening decisions for future phases.


II.    Statewide and Hospital-Specific or Hospital System-Specific Capacity Criteria and Required Public Health and Safety  Standards and for Entering Phase 2: Cautious

Beginning June 8, 2020, hospitals and hospital systems may be eligible to move into Phase 2 if the following capacity criteria, more fully described in Section II of the Phase 1 Guidance, continue to be met:

  • Statewide Intensive Care Unit (ICU) Bed Capacity: The 7-day average of the number of available, staffed adult ICU beds statewide must be at least 30% of total staffed adult ICU beds (including staffed surge ICU beds).
  • Statewide Inpatient Bed Capacity: The 7-day average of the number of available, staffed adult inpatient beds (adult ICU and adult medical/surgical beds) statewide must be at least 30% of total staffed adult inpatient beds (including staffed surge beds).
  • Hospital-Specific or Hospital System-Specific Bed Capacity Maintenance: The 7-day average of the hospital’s or hospital system’s available, staffed adult inpatient beds (adult ICU and adult medical/surgical beds) must be at least 20% of its total staffed adult inpatient bed capacity (including staffed surge beds) throughout Phase 2: Cautious.

In addition, hospitals and hospital systems must continue to be in compliance with the public health and safety standards described in Section IV of the Phase 1 Guidance, including specific criteria related to: a) personal protective equipment (PPE); b) workforce safety; c) patient safety; and d) infection control (see additional standards in Section III. B. below).

DPH will continue to monitor bed capacity at both the statewide and individual hospital or hospital-system level and may suspend or limit provision of any of the procedures and services described in Section III of the Phase 1 Guidance or Section III of this guidance based on its determination that the available bed capacity is deemed to jeopardize the hospital’s, hospital system’s, or overall health system’s ability to respond to patient demand.


III.    Guidance on Recommended Procedures and Services for Phase 2: Cautious

If the statewide and hospital-specific or hospital-system capacity criteria and public health and safety standards have been met in accordance with the Phase 1 Guidance, a hospital or hospital system may incrementally begin in-person delivery of in-person elective, non-urgent procedures and services, including routine office visits, subject to the following requirements and limitations.

  1. Prioritization of Services in Phase 2

Hospitals and hospital systems must establish and adhere to a written prioritization policy for Phase 2 non-urgent care and scheduling. Hospitals and hospital systems must use their clinical judgment and their prioritization policy to determine which in-person services meet the criteria outlined below for in-person services in Phase 2. The prioritization policy should promote equitable access to care for all populations, without regard for patient’s insurance type.

The hospital’s or hospital system’s prioritization policy for scheduling and delivery of Phase 2 services must be developed in consultation with the hospital or hospital system’s reopening governance body (which must include representation from senior hospital or hospital system leadership and labor representatives) required in the Phase 1 Guidance and must include the following six requirements:

  • Hospitals and hospital systems should continue to prioritize the use of telehealth services where clinically appropriate and feasible for a given patient.
  • For in-person services and procedures, hospitals and hospital systems should prioritize high-priority preventative services, pediatric care and immunizations, and urgent procedures that would lead to high risk or significant worsening of the patient’s condition if deferred, as described in Phase 1 Guidance.
  • Hospital and hospital systems should then identify and prioritize the patients and services that, based on the clinical determination of the hospital or hospital system and its providers, are most critical and time sensitive. In identifying patients and services and making its clinical determination, the hospital or hospital system should prioritize patients and services that meet the following criteria:
    • Patients with acute illnesses that cannot be addressed through telehealth
    • Patients with chronic illness, including but not limited to those that put patients at higher risk for complications from COVID-19
    • Patients with behavioral health conditions, disability, and/or risk factors related to social determinants of health, without regard for patient’s insurance type
    • Adult preventive care clinically necessary to be performed in-person (including screening/diagnostic procedures)
    • Patients with progressive conditions that will worsen without surgery or other intervention, or whose symptoms negatively affect their quality of life or ability to perform daily activities
    • Patients needing in-person visits to monitor health status or assess progression of illness
  • Hospitals and hospital systems should consider deferring certain non-essential, elective procedures and services such as those that do not meet the prioritization criteria above and which are likely to produce high concentrations of respiratory droplets (aerosolization) and/or that could require or result in the use of a significant level of certain health care system resources (e.g., PPE and pharmaceutical supplies in short supply; transfusions; general hospital, ICU, and/or post-acute admissions).
  • Hospitals and health systems may provide in-person group treatment for behavioral health within the following parameters:
    • Telehealth and/or in-person one-on-one treatment should be prioritized in lieu of group therapy when clinically appropriate
    • In-person group treatment should only be utilized when, in the clinical judgment of the provider, the benefit significantly outweighs the risks for the participants, taking into account each individual’s circumstances and medical and social risk factors
    • No more than 6 people may be present in a single group treatment session or room, including participants, facilitators and/or treatment providers
    • Rooms must be configured to ensure social distancing of at least 6 feet
    • No food or drink may be served
    • No physical contact or sharing of materials during a session\In-person group treatment sessions should be limited to the minimum amount of time that the provider determines is clinically effective (e.g., 60-90 minutes or less)
    • Providers must adhere to all other public health and safety standards described in this guidance and any other relevant guidance from CDC and DPH
    • Hospitals and hospital systems should not deliver the following services in Phase 2 and should postpone scheduling to future phases: 1) elective cosmetic procedures, and 2) day programs.
    • Safety Standards for Invasive Procedures and Services

In order to manage statewide PPE consumption rates, reduce COVID-19 transmission, ensure compliance with public health and safety standards, and maintain hospital capacity in case of further peaks in prevalence during Phase 2, hospitals and hospital systems should take steps to cautiously and incrementally resume non-essential, elective invasive procedures and services. [3]

Specifically, for all non-essential, elective invasive procedures and services, providers must attest to monitoring patient volume in each facility, clinic, or office setting where such procedures and services are performed and must schedule patient visits in order to ensure:

  1. Ongoing compliance with the public health and safety guidelines in Phase 1 Guidance (Section IV.) including, but not limited to, standards related to PPE supply and use, restricting the number of health care workers in the treatment space to those individuals necessary to complete the service or procedure for the patient, screening patients in advance of a service or procedure, administrative and environmental controls that facilitate social distancing, such as minimizing time in waiting areas and minimizing contact between patients through scheduling modifications; and
  2. Ongoing compliance with CDC requirements[4] and other public health guidance regarding environmental infection controls, which include specific requirements to suspend the use of all examination, procedural, and surgical areas in-between procedures for a mandated timeframe necessary for sufficient air changes to remove air-borne contaminants[5], prior to the thorough cleaning and disinfection of the room and equipment, as required in the Phase 1 Guidance.

Hospital or hospital systems should postpone any non-essential, elective procedure or service if these safety standards cannot be met.


IV.     Compliance and Reporting

Attestation Form
Before delivering the services described in Section III of this guidance, hospitals and hospital systems must first attest, on a form prescribed by DPH, to continuing to meet all Phase 1 criteria and standards, and three additional conditions for Phase 2: Cautious:

  1. The hospital or hospital system has established a prioritization policy for scheduling and delivery of Phase 2 non-urgent care in accordance with this guidance and is making clinical determinations about service provision in a manner consistent with health equity principles in such policy and this guidance;
  2. The hospital or hospital system is monitoring patient volume for non-essential, elective invasive procedures and services, in each facility, clinic, or office setting where such procedures and services are performed and is scheduling patient visits in a manner consistent this guidance.
  3. The hospital or hospital system is in compliance with CDC requirements and other public health guidance regarding environmental infection controls, which include specific requirements to suspend the use of all examination, procedural, and surgical areas in-between procedures for a mandated timeframe necessary for sufficient air changes to remove air-borne contaminants, prior to the thorough cleaning and disinfection of the room and equipment, as required in the Phase 1 Guidance.

Each hospital in a hospital system must maintain the signed attestation and make it available upon request of DPH at any time. A copy of the signed attestation form must be prominently posted at each hospital and on the hospital’s website with a link to the Commonwealth’s Reopening website and submitted to the state before the hospital moves into Phase 2: Cautious.

Hospitals or hospital systems must submit the attestation form via DPH’s secure reporting web-based portal, the Health Care Facility Reporting System (HCFRS). Hospitals or hospital systems should upload the completed attestation as a new incident case, under the incident type “Phase 2 Attestation” and then submit it. If the hospital or hospital system no longer meets the Phase 2 criteria, the hospital or hospital system must notify DPH via a message in the notes section using the same incident case in HCFRS and promptly suspend provision of Phase 2 services, as outlined in this guidance.

Written Policies and Protocols
Hospitals or hospital systems must update and maintain written policies and protocols that meet or exceed the standards outlined in this guidance including the prioritization policy required in Section III of this guidance. Such policies, protocols, and documentation must be regularly updated and made available to DPH upon request at any time.

Compliance
DPH will monitor and assess compliance and may require remedial action or suspension of Phase 2: Cautious procedures and services as warranted.


[1] Elective Procedures Order. Massachusetts Department of Public Health (March 15, 2020): https://www.mass.gov/doc/march-15-2020-elective-procedures-order. Memorandum: Nonessential, Elective Invasive Procedures in Hospitals and Ambulatory Surgical Centers during the COVID-19 Outbreak. Massachusetts Department of Public Health (March 15, 2020): https://www.mass.gov/info-details/covid-19-state-of-emergency

[2] As used in this document, “hospital” means an acute care hospital, unless otherwise specified. For the purposes of this guidance, acute care hospitals shall not include comprehensive cancer centers, as defined in G.L. c. 118E, § 8A, or freestanding pediatric hospitals, as defined in 105 CMR 130.

[3] DPH defines nonessential, elective invasive procedures as procedures that are scheduled in advance because the procedure does not involve a medical emergency; provided, however, that terminating a pregnancy is not considered a nonessential, elective invasive procedure for the purpose of this guidance.  However, the ultimate decision is based on clinical judgement by the caring physician.
Examples of nonessential, elective invasive procedures may include but are not limited to: any procedures involving skin incision; injections of any substance into a joint space or body cavity; orthopedic procedures (e.g. hip or knee replacement); endoscopy (e.g., colonoscopy, bronchoscopy, esophagogastric endoscopy, cystoscopy, percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy, J-tube placements, nephrostomy tube placements); invasive radiologic procedures; dermatology procedures (e.g. excision and deep cryotherapy for malignant lesions- excluding cryotherapy for benign lesions); invasive ophthalmic procedures including miscellaneous procedures involving implants; oral procedures (e.g. tooth extraction); podiatric invasive procedures (e.g., removal of ingrown toenail); skin or wound debridement; kidney stone lithotripsy; or colposcopy and/or endometrial biopsy[3] DPH defines nonessential, elective invasive procedures as procedures that are scheduled in advance because the procedure does not involve a medical emergency; provided, however, that terminating a pregnancy is not considered a nonessential, elective invasive procedure for the purpose of this guidance.  However, the ultimate decision is based on clinical judgement by the caring physician.

Examples of nonessential, elective invasive procedures may include but are not limited to: any procedures involving skin incision; injections of any substance into a joint space or body cavity; orthopedic procedures (e.g. hip or knee replacement); endoscopy (e.g., colonoscopy, bronchoscopy, esophagogastric endoscopy, cystoscopy, percutaneous endoscopic gastronomy, J-tube placements, nephrostomy tube placements); invasive radiologic procedures; dermatology procedures (e.g. excision and deep cryotherapy for malignant lesions- excluding cryotherapy for benign lesions); invasive ophthalmic procedures including miscellaneous procedures involving implants; oral procedures (e.g. tooth extraction); podiatric invasive procedures (e.g., removal of ingrown toenail); skin or wound debridement; kidney stone lithotripsy; or colposcopy and/or endometrial biopsy

[4] https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/infection-control.html

[5] https://www.cdc.gov/infectioncontrol/guidelines/environmental/appendix/air.html#tableb1


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

APRIL 7, 2020

NORTHAMPTON – Cooley Dickinson Hospital will host a radiothon, Wednesday, April 8 from 6am – 6pm to raise funds for the hospital’s COVID-19 Response Fund.

Says Cooley Dickinson President and CEO Joanne Marqusee, “Cooley Dickinson is always here for our community and there has never been a time like this when we need your help and support more. The COVID-19 Response Fund has been created specifically for patients to get the care they need during this public health crisis. Your support is critical to help us and our dedicated health care workers continue to take care of our community.”

Funds raised during the radiothon will help Cooley Dickinson purchase needed equipment like N95 masks, gowns, gloves, and hand sanitizer; supporting care that is needed, and provided, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

Every gift will be matched up to $75,000 thanks to generous support from local community members and local businesses like Greenfield & Northampton Cooperative Bank, bankESB, Burger King, Greenfield Savings Bank, and the Cooley Dickinson Medical Staff.

Local residents can support the Response Fund in the following ways:

Chief Development Officer Diane Dukette notes, “Your gifts help protect those heroes on the frontline of this pandemic, right here in our community. Please consider donating today – Cooley Dickinson, your local hospital, is counting on you.”

To access local resources about COVID-19, visit www.cooleydickinson.org


UPDATE:

APRIL 5, 2020

Cooley Dickinson Implements New Mask Policy: Masks Required for All Patients and Visitors Begins Monday

NORTHAMPTON – Effective Monday, April 6, all patients and visitors to Cooley Dickinson Hospital or any Cooley Dickinson location will be supplied with a procedural or surgical mask upon entrance to the building. The mask must be worn as part of Cooley Dickinson’s continued efforts to protect our health care workers, our patients, and to combat any additional community spread.

  • Patients – Beginning Monday, all patients, including those in all inpatient areas, the emergency department and ambulatory settings/provider offices, must wear the mask provided. Inpatients must wear the mask while outside of their room or during prolonged face-to-face encounters in their rooms. All other patients must wear the mask for the duration of their visit or encounter.
  • Visitors – Beginning Monday, all visitors, including vendors, contractors, EMS personnel and law enforcement, must immediately put on the mask provided and wear it continuously until leaving the building.Signs at entrances of Cooley Dickinson Hospital and other Cooley Dickinson locations remind visitors, patients, and others who need to access any Cooley Dickinson of the universal mask policy.Visit the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention website for tips on how to protect yourself and others.

UPDATE:

APRIL 4, 2020

EXTENDED HOURS: In an effort to facilitate treatment of orthopedic injury patients during the COVID-19 crisis, Cooley Dickinson’s Orthopedic Injury Clinic Walk-in hours have been increased to:

Beginning Monday 4/6: Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday noon – 8:00 p.m.

The injury clinic provides an option for orthopedic injuries, including x-ray availability, and is located at the Orthopedic Practice in West Hatfield. It can be an alternative to the Emergency Department for some patients.

The Injury Clinic treats:

  • Work Related Injuries
  • Sports Injuries
  • Fractures Sprains and strains
  • Dislocations Broken Bones Shoulder and Knee Injuries
  • Lacerations, suturing and splinters

Please call your primary care doctor for direction or go to the Emergency Department for the following: Visible bone / multiple fractures, head injury/concussion, back and neck injuries and any other life threatening emergency.

If you are experiencing a fever, runny nose, cough, shortness of breath or flu-like symptoms, please call your primary care doctor.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

APRIL 1, 2020

As part of its mission to provide the community with personalized, compassionate and personalized care and to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, Cooley Dickinson Health Care has opened a COVD-19community call center. “We want our community to know that we are here for them and doing all we can to provide them with links to medical resources and credible, trusted information,” says Cooley Dickinson President and CEO Joanne Marqusee.

The COVID-19 call center is staffed Monday -Friday from 8 am to 6:30 pm and Saturday and Sunday from 8 am – 5 pm by health care workers who can field general questions about COVID-19. Those types of inquiries include how and where to donate medical-grade supplies;how to access a primary care provider, if someone doesn’t have one; and where to seek care for something other than a respiratory illness, such as urgent care. Online resources are also available from the Cooley Dickinson website.

Contact the COVID-19 Call Center, Monday –Friday, 8 am to 6:30 pm; Saturday & Sunday, 8 am to 5 pm at 1-888-554-4234. The call center is not a substitute for medical advice from your provider. Anyone who thinks they have COVID-19 and is experiencing COVID-19 symptoms should call their primary care provider to report their symptoms. Once screened by a medical provider, that provider will advise if testing is needed and will explain how to obtain that testing. The call center can advise those who do not have a primary care provider and Cooley Dickinson has many providers accepting new patients. Testing continues to be limited. Cooley Dickinson is following strict testing criteria so that it tests those for whom testing will make the most clinical difference.


POLICY UPDATE:

MARCH 27, 2020

In order to conserve masks for patients with respiratory symptoms and health care workers caring for patients with COVID-19, we are not giving masks to patients who do not have symptoms; visitors or delivery people.

You will be safe walking through the hospital without a surgical mask as we have excellent air quality. Any health care workers you encounter will be masked per our universal mask use policy, which helps to prevent the spread of infection.

Please clean your hands often at the hand sanitizer stations located throughout the hospital.

Thank you for understanding.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

MARCH 18, 2020

As expected, given the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19), Cooley Dickinson has seen an increase in people with respiratory symptoms and increased COVID-19 testing over the past several days. “Our infection control and emergency preparedness teams have been preparing for this possibility since we first learned of the outbreak in China.” Said Cooley Dickinson Chief Executive Officer Joanne Marqusee, “We are so proud of our staff for all they have been doing to prepare and to protect the health of our patients and community. We work around the clock and will continue to do so.”

We were notified by the Mass Department of Public Health that two patients tested at Cooley Dickinson Hospital have tested positive for novel Coronavirus COVID-19. We have coordinated closely with the Department of Public of Health and are following all Mass DPH and Centers for Disease Control guidelines and protocols. For the care of these patients, we followed all isolation and PPE protocols.

We would like to remind the public that testing is still quite limited so strict criteria are being used to determine who gets testing. With or without a test, people with mild symptoms should stay home. If they are concerned about whether they need to be seen by a provider, they should call their primary care physician.


UPDATE 3-17-2020: Visitor Restrictions

New Visitor Restrictions

We take the health and safety of our patients, visitors and community members seriously. Given the ever-changing nature of the coronavirus (COVID-19), we are changing our visitor guidelines and restricting visitors.

Visit the CDC and Mass Department of Public Health websites for the most up-to-date information.


COVID-19 Testing

Currently we must still use CDC criteria and call DPH for testing requests. We expect a commercial test to be available, but that appears to still be several weeks away.

How is Cooley Dickinson preparing for a possible outbreak of coronavirus?

There are a number of proactive preparedness efforts underway at Cooley Dickinson. Specifically:

  • Leadership teams at Cooley Dickinson and our infection control department are in constant contact and coordinating our preparedness with our parent, Massachusetts General Hospital, and sister hospitals within the Partners HealthCare network; local and state health departments, as well as the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).
  • We are already screening patients to identify high-risk travel.
  • We are coordinating with the Mass Department of Public Health to have testing, for select cases, performed by the state laboratory.
  • A multi-disciplinary team is collaborating to ensure Cooley Dickinson is ready to respond, if there is a need to test or provide care for patients with possible COVID-19.
  • For staff that have international travel plans or that may be returning from travel, Cooley Dickinson is following Partners extensive and current travel policy and coordinating with our colleagues at Partners.
  • Remember that good hand hygiene is always important; it is the key to protect ourselves, as well as patients, families and caregivers. For the most up-to-date information, visit the Mass DPH website and CDC website.

What is the difference between coronavirus and viruses that cause the common cold?

There are many types of human coronavirus, including some that cause mild to moderate upper respiratory tract illnesses.

Most people get infected with one or more of these common coronaviruses at some point in their lives. The virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is NOT the same as these common coronaviruses. COVID-19 is a new coronavirus from an animal reservoir that had not been previously identified. Patients with COVID-19 will be evaluated and cared for differently than patients with common coronavirus diagnosis.

Tests that we use at Cooley Dickinson facilities do not detect COVID-19. Testing to detect this virus is only performed through the Department of Public Health.

What should I do if I have cold symptoms or a mild cough? Do I need testing for coronavirus?

If you have only cold symptoms or a low grade fever, call your provider. Do not go to the Emergency Department and do not go to your provider’s office or a walk-in urgent care clinic.

At Cooley Dickinson, we have a triage call system in place that will address each person’s unique situation. Once we have your information, and if it meets the screening criteria, your provider will reach out to the Mass Department of Public Health (DPH) for guidance and possible testing. But there is a shortage of test kits so currently DPH will test only those with the highest risk.

If you are sick enough to see a health care provider, call your provider’s office before going to their office. If you have been in close contact with someone who has laboratory-proven coronavirus, call before going to the provider’s office.

If you or someone you know is experiencing a medical emergency, call 9-1-1.

What should community members do to stay safe?

Although the risk to Massachusetts residents of the novel coronavirus remains low, the risk for influenza is currently high. Many of the things you do to help prevent colds and the flu can help protect you against other respiratory viruses:

Should I wear a mask when I go out in public?

Public health officials believe that the cloth masks do little to protect against coronavirus and can give people a false sense of security. The best protection against coronavirus is to wash your hands frequently with soap and water. Alcohol gel is also an option.

Many patients who present to Cooley Dickinson facilities with respiratory symptoms are evaluated for viral infections using nasal swab testing capable of detecting 20 different pathogens.

The results may include one of several types of coronavirus that commonly cause respiratory infections in the United States. Note, that there are many types of human coronaviruses including some that commonly cause mild to moderate upper-respiratory tract illnesses (229E, NL63, OC43, or HKU1).

Most people get infected with one or more of these common coronaviruses at some point in their lives. To be clear, the virus causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is NOT the same as these common coronaviruses. COVID-19 is a NEW coronavirus from an animal reservoir that had not been previously identified. Patients with COVID-19 will be evaluated and cared for differently than patients with common coronavirus diagnosis.

Tests that we use at Cooley Dickinson facilities DO NOT detect COVID-19. Testing to detect this virus is only performed at the CDC through the Departments of Public Health.

Masks can be useful in some settings, such as a clinic waiting room, to prevent someone who has a respiratory illness from spreading it to others. There is no hard evidence that wearing a mask protects the wearer outside of the health care setting.

When it is appropriate to wear a mask in public: if you are sick and need to go out. Masks are appropriate in waiting rooms, if you need to wait for an extended period, or if you are caring for someone who is sick.

Helpful Links

FAQ: Coronavirus and Children

CDC Public Health Response Update 2-28-2020

Massachusetts DPH COVID-19 Information Page

Questions? Contact feedback@cooleydickinson.org


CLOSURE NOTICE
Medical Records Patient Walk-in Services

In an effort to minimize COVID-19 spread we will be suspending Patient Walk-in services until further notice. To request a copy of your medical records:

  • Submit a request via Patient Gateway. Once you access Patient Gateway, go to
  • Health > Health Tools > Request Records or
  • Messaging > Request Records
  • Please go to https://www.partners.org/medicalrecords to get a copy of an ROI Authorization Form and follow instructions, How to Submit a Request.

For fastest service, please provide an email address in your request to deliver the copies via secure email or indicate delivery to your Patient Gateway account.

For any additional questions, including how to submit an urgent request, please call the HIM ROI unit at 617-726-2361